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January 18
2012年1月18日

做一個「正派」的人

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近日在一次朋友聚會中見到李純恩先生,後來又有機會拜讀他的一篇文章,題目叫「正派」,文章不長,言簡意賅,特別徵得他的同意上載於網誌上與各位分享。誠意寄語同學們,除了讀好書,還要學做人,做一個「正派」的人。

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正派     李純恩

大書法家黃苗子逝世,羅孚先生對他的評價是:「他是一個好人,很正派。」

「正派」這個字眼,好久沒有人提了。

今天,香港的家長教孩子,多數是要學會些甚麼本事,從很小的時候學英語、學鋼琴、學游泳、學芭蕾舞開始,到長大要他們學經濟、學投資、學法律、學醫科,然後要他們做律師、做投行、做醫生,十八般謀生武藝都精通,塑造了一個「精英」,但在家教中,往往就少了「正派」這兩個字。

從前,中國人不管是大富大貴之家,還是書香門第,或是販夫走卒,家裏有了孩子,頭一樣教的就是做人要「正派」。因為那時候的人都知道,一個孩子長大之後像不像樣,首先要打好一個基礎,這個基礎,不是各種各樣的謀生技能,而是「正派」。

在那時候,一個人正不正派是十分要緊的,若不正派,即使他事業上做得多麼出色,別人也是不齒的。反之,普普通通一個人很正派,這個人也得人稱讚。

這樣的價值觀,現在是愈來愈淡薄了,如今的家長,都怕孩子長大活不下去,填鴨一樣填他們謀生技能,誰會的東西多誰就叻仔,誰賺的錢多誰就成功。於是隔三差五,就有豪門爭產,億萬富豪的女兒走出來,不但沒有一點貴氣,還像急要賣肉養家。

這就是在今天,家教中缺了「正派」二字。

註:本文曾載於香港經濟日報(2012年1月13日)。

 

 

 



To be a "decent" person

 

I met Mr Benny Li Shun Yan at a get-together for my friends the other day. Soon after, I happened to read his concise and very clear article, "Decency". With Mr Li's approval, I am uploading the story to my web blog. I want to share with students the writer's central idea that one ought to learn how to conduct oneself and be a "decent" person in addition to doing well in one's academic studies.

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Decency      By Benny Li Shun Yan

When the great calligrapher Huang Miaozi passed away, Mr Luo Fu spoke of him as "a good man, a very decent man".

This news made me think that the word "decency" is rarely mentioned these days.

In present-day Hong Kong, most parents want their children to develop a range of skills: learning English, playing the piano, swimming, and practising ballet, for example. When the kids grow up, they are expected to study financial investment, law or medicine. After they graduate, they are encouraged to become lawyers, managers at investment banks or doctors. Highly skilled and well educated, they form an "elite" in society.

But what of "decency"?

In the old days, whether you are born into a rich, scholar-gentry or working-class family, the first lessons you learned from your parents concerned politeness and civility. People knew back then that only by laying a solid foundation early on could children be expected to become accomplished later in life. This kind of foundation did not entail simply the power to earn a good living; it meant something more, something of higher value.

In those days, there was a world of difference between a polite and an impolite person. Even if an offensive person was successful, he was held in contempt, whereas a decent ordinary person was widely acclaimed.

Nowadays people have become indifferent to such values. Parents focus their complete attention on their children mastering various skills through cramming-type teaching methods. Mums and dads are so worried that their offspring won't be able to make a living when they grow up. Parents think versatile children are good and that those who earn big bucks are successful. No wonder we hear news of moral degeneration from time to time.

We also hear about frequent legacy disputes in rich and influential families, seeing a daughter of a billionaire who looks more like someone who has to feed her family on prostitution rather than coming from a good family.

That happens today simply because the word "decency" is no longer a part of family education.

Note:
This article was published in the Hong Kong Economic Times on 13 January, 2012.


January 18, 2012

 

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